The joy of music!

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By Anita Manley

A recent study shows that music takes 13 minutes to “release sadness” and 9 minutes to make you happy. https://www.classicfm.com/music-news/music-to-release-sadness-and-feel-happier-study/?fbclid=IwAR0LeAgGxATyvxVpAUkHOS8amN-VObnrssGyee_EoYl4G-ARoZKBnTwuOh8

Listen to music!

Ever since I was a young kid, music has played a big role in my life. I used to listen to the American Top 40 with Casey Casem every week on CKGM radio from my bedroom in Beaconsfield, PQ. I’d be belting out the tunes as I sang into my round hair brush, admiring my form in the mirror — a rock star wanna be.

Whenever I am alone and perhaps not feeling the best, I turn on some of my favourite tunes. Music can be uplifting, spiritual, happy and sometimes sad — but it almost always takes you somewhere, on a journey. In order to get our groove on and into washing the dishes, my husband and I turn on some music so we can sing along and maybe do a little dancing in between washing and drying. The music seems to make the unsavory task of washing dishes go by faster, even making it somewhat enjoyable — dare I say! I also listen to a workout playlist when I am on the stationary bike, or while out on a walk along the canal.

Recently, on Valentines Day, I witnessed women living in supportive housing being absolutely joyful due to a couple of musicians who came and played their hearts out while the ladies sang and danced to some old style tunes. (Johnny Cash, The Beatles, Elvis, etc.) One of the ladies said to me “This sure beats me crying all night in my room and eating a dozen cupcakes by myself because I am alone on Valentines Day.” She was smiling and enjoying herself — because live music filled the air.

I often relate to the quote: “When you’re happy, you enjoy the music. When you’re sad you understand the lyrics.” — Frank Ocean

I cannot count the times, over the many years I was experiencing intense psychosis, that I could relate to all the lyrics of almost every song on the radio. I really felt as though most of these songs were either written by me, or written for me. I connected with them on such a deep and personal level.

Here are a few songs compiled into a list that people with mental health struggles might enjoy: https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/songs-about-mental-health_l_5e326e79c5b69a19a4a9f977?guccounter=1

A couple of weekends ago, my husband and I went out to listen to some live, local talent. We never know what we are going to see or learn when we venture out to listen to music, but we always have a good time. On this occasion, my old university friend and award-winning singer/songwriter John Allaire was actually playing Chris Hadfield’s Space Guitar! No kidding — this guitar has been to space and John is the custodian.

So, be sure to listen to some music on a daily basis — it really can help you feel happier and you never know when it could become an “out-of-this-world experience”.

My friend, John Allaire (local musician), with Chris Hadfield’s Space Guitar.

How Winterlude helps beat Winter Blues

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By Anita Manley

Every year in Ottawa, ever since I can remember (I lived here as early as 1986), there has been an urban winter celebration in Canada’s Capital Region. It is called Winterlude. This year, people from far and wide have been celebrating since January 31, and it will go on until Feb 17, 2020. Now I know many cities have winter festivals that are quite a lot of fun, but, in my opinion, nothing beats what we do here in the Nation’s Capital.

Firstly, we have the historic Rideau Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which, each year (for the past 50 years), becomes the Rideau Canal Skateway, the world’s largest skating rink. It measures 7.8 km in length and has the equivalent surface area of 90 Olympic ice hockey rinks. Thousands of people from around the world come to skate on this canal. Locals get out to skate with family and friends, or they use it to commute to work or school. Non-skaters also enjoy walking along the edges, away from skaters. Of course, an outing along the canal would not be complete without visiting the Beavertails hut — celebrating 40 years of being in business this year. These yummy fried pieces of dough, shaped like a beaver’s tail are topped with a choice of 14 different flavours. My favourite Beavertail is sprinkled with cinnamon sugar and fresh lemon juice — a “Killalloo Sunrise”. If you talk to many parents, I’m sure you will often hear that a skate along the canal, with their children, must include a Beavertail and a hot chocolate.

Other outdoor events to enjoy during Winterlude are the ice and snow sculptures. These are beautiful and unique and spread out across Ottawa and Gatineau. There are other activities like snow slides for the kiddies and the introduction of snowboarding and downhill skiing — all at The Snowflake Kingdom, Jacques Cartier Park.

Other hot spots are Sparks Street where there is a light show and live entertainment, Bank Street and The Glebe (including the Aberdeen Pavilion).

There is really so much to do and see and many options to be active during Winterlude. It is bound to get even die-hard couch potatoes like me – outside, joining in on the fun. This past weekend, despite the sub-zero temperatures, the SUN was shining. All the more reason to get out and enjoy the festivities. Winterlude really does help beat the winter blues.

If you do not live in Ottawa, consider making it your next winter destination during Winterlude, when there is fun everywhere!

Me, enjoying a Maple Beavertail this year! Trying something new! It was yummy.
The very long lineup in front of the Beavertails hut (during Winterlude, 2020).