I LOVE to swim…

Featured

By Anita Manley

I just returned from the pool!

Since May, with the exception of vacation time, I’ve been swimming three days a week. I’m a life-long swimmer. I learned how to swim at a very young age, and later I progressed through all the necessary Red Cross levels to become a Lifeguard/Instructor. I have swam on swim teams, swam lengths alone and gone for periods of time when I was not swimming at all, with the exception of an occasional dip in a friend’s pool or a lake. (COVID was especially difficult as, like many others, I could not swim at all during that long, very stressful period).

I know this for sure… I am happiest when I am swimming regularly. I can cope with the stresses of life much more effectively and the regular cardio exercise just brings an authentic smile to my face. Not to mention, my doctor always sees improved results with my bloodwork when I am swimming.

I do prefer swimming on a swim team with a coach and other teammates. The rules and lane etiquette that come with this atmosphere are what I appreciate the most. Everyone knows what they are doing and where they should be swimming. If not, the coach helps with this. The odd time while swimming at the club that I belong to now, the average swimmer just doesn’t know about lane etiquette, and it can send me into a frazzled state. “Can’t they see that I’m swimming in this lane!” I think to myself. “There is room over there, why don’t they just stay in their lane! UGH!” But, without a coach and also without extensive swimming experience, some people just are not aware of the rules. I need to simmer down, be patient, and just move into another lane.

Thanks for letting me vent!

Back to the benefits of swimming and the inspiration for this post. I was reading some information on social media about swimming and came across this TED post on Instagram:

3 reasons swimming is good for your brain:

from neurobiologist Seena Matthew PhD

“It’s no secret that aerobic exercise is important to your overall health– but when it comes to your brain, swimming can make an extra splash. Let’s dive into the benefits!”

  1. Swimming can boost your memory.
    Studies have shown that swimming (even 20 minutes a day!) can improve attention span, short-and long-term memory– and even reduce the cognitive impacts of aging.
  2. Swimming can boost your mood.
    Because swimming is a full-body workout, it increases blood flow which releases feel-good hormones like endorphins.
    It also promotes the release of neurotransmitters– like serotonin– which can help reduce depression and anxiety.
  3. Swimming can boost your ability to learn.
    Aerobic exercise improves cell growth and builds new pathways in your brain. This can help you learn and store new information and recall it with higher accuracy.

So, not only is swimming helping me with overall physical health, it is also helping to improve my mental health. I hope to be able to keep up this routine well into my eighties, or even longer!

What do you do to stay healthy? Drop me a line. I’d love to hear from you!

This is the pool I generally swim laps in 3 days a week! Looks inviting doesn’t it?

The Many Benefits of Creating Art Guest Blog — Elaine Comeau

Elaine has been creating art in many forms for as long as she can remember. After many years of working as an Interior Designer, a decorative painter, and teaching many creative courses at Algonquin College, she opened up her own teaching art studio in 2009. She offers art classes, group sessions and private lessons starting at age 5 to no age limit. Go to: https://wildpigments.com for more info.

“Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life” — Pablo Picasso


Being creative, whether its painting, music, writing, dancing, knitting, cooking, woodworking etc., is so good for your soul. Creative thinking allows you to lose yourself in the process so you can find yourself.


Here are some of the benefits of being creative:


Being creative is a very powerful tool and a great distraction from your worries as it gives your busy brain a break which allows clearer thinking.

Being creative requires some concentration and focus on what you are doing which quietens the brain. Allow yourself to get absorbed into the process and lose track of time.


It relieves stress and helps to reduce depression and anxieties.


It is great brain work, allowing visualization, exploring new ideas, and it fuels imagination and memory work.


Creating something with your hands provides a sense of accomplishment, boosts self-esteem, and it is a tangible way to express yourself. This is excellent at any age and especially for the elderly.


There are so many forms of art that does not require great artistic skills but more imagination. For example: collage, abstract, mixed media, palette knife painting, papier-mâché, steam punk collage work, paint pouring and much more. Don’t be afraid to try something new.


Art, such as drawing, painting and sculpture, is not limited to the talented few. Art is for everyone. If you can write your name, you can learn to create art — at any age. The desire to create art is all you need to get started, even if you think you are bad at it.


Learning an art form through books and the internet is fine and the best way to learn during the COVID-19 pandemic. Once we are back to a new normal, taking creative classes is a wonderful way to get out of the house and make social connections with lots of guidance and support from the teacher and your fellow students. This can help to improve your mental health and happiness.


I miss teaching art and my students of all ages. I am looking forward to getting back to offering art classes again and welcoming people into my studio in Ottawa, when it is safe to do so.


In the meantime, get creative and have fun doing it! Check out your local art store for deliveries and curb side pick up.


Link for further reading:https://www.businessinsider.com/why-you-should-make-art-even-if-youre-bad-2016-6

Papier mâché, “Stella Louise”, by Elaine Comeau, Wild Pigments Art Studio. 
My very talented friend, Elaine Comeau, painting in her art studio.